Sri Lanka Map
Site Index
Contact
Random
Our Travel Books
Advertising / Press

Galle Face Green

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Budget Guesthouses in Colombo

Laid out in 1857 by the British governor Sir Henry Ward, Galle Face Green is a park separating the hectic life of Colombo and the Indian Ocean. The green is the city’s largest open space and a popular spot during sunset, when hundreds of Sri Lankans come to fly kites, play cricket and eat ice cream.

Colombo Blog

We walked along the green one evening, just as the sun was tucking itself behind the clouds over the ocean. One of the great things about Sri Lanka’s being so close to the equator is that the sun rises and sets around the same time all year round. So regardless of when you’re visiting Colombo, make sure to head to Galle Face Green at around 6:30pm. If you get lucky, you’ll enjoy a spectacular sunset and marvel as the city turns a strange, deep shade of crimson.

At the end of the green is the historic Galle Face Hotel, a beautiful lodging which retains much of its colonial charm. The hotel’s best feature is its veranda, with chairs and tables facing out to sea. Unsurprisingly, it’s one of the city’s most popular spots for an evening drink. We sat down and, after sending the waiter to fetch a couple Three Coins lagers, felt as though we’d fallen back through time. So this is how the British lords of colonial Ceylon lived. Not bad. The breeze coming off the ocean was wonderful, the beers cold and delicious, the view unbeatable, the service spectacular, and the other patrons well-dressed and in pleasant moods. I doubt there’s a better way to cap off a busy day in Colombo.

Location on our Sri Lanka Map
Please Like Us On Facebook

Indian Ocean
Colombo Beach
Galle Face Green
Skyline Colombo
Sri Lanka Love
Wood Colombo
Sunset in Sri Lanka
Galle Face
Late Night Snack
Crab Snack
Galle Face Hotel
, , , ,
February 11, 2012 at 6:13 am Comments (4)

The Modern Temple of Seema Malaka

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Learn About Buddhism Here

In the middle of Beira Lake, the sleek Buddhist Temple of Seema Malaka rises elegantly from the tepid water. In comparison to the garishly colorful Sri Subravanian Kovil, which we had just finished visiting, Seema Malaka is a marvel of restraint.

Geoffrey Bawa

After the original Seema Malaka temple had sunk into the lake, the government commissioned Geoffrey Bawa to design a replacement in the 1970s. Bawa, known as the founder of Tropical Modernism, is Sri Lanka’s most famous architect and was one of the most influential in Asia. His stylish creations can be found throughout Colombo, and Seema Malaka is one of the highlights.

The temple is spread across three raised platforms in the lake, connected to each other and to the mainland by bridges. Bawa intended his design to echo the jungle temples of Anuradhapura, also bound together by walkways. Seema Malaka is small and, with the cool breeze coming off the lake, a sense of serenity and simplicity dominates the scene — quite the accomplishment, in the middle of steamy, chaotic Colombo.

Location on our Sri Lanka Map
Book Your Sri Lanka Hotel Here

Seema Malaka
Colombo Blog
Steeling The Show
Bo Tree
Happy Buddha
Buddha Art
Spooky God
Elephant God
Multi Handed God
Buddhist Crow
, , , , , , , , , ,
February 10, 2012 at 2:07 pm Comments (3)

The Multi-Cultural Chaos of Colombo

Add to Flipboard Magazine.

Cheap Flights To Sri Lanka

Although the official capital of Sri Lanka is the nearby satellite city of Sri Jayawardenapura Kotte, Colombo is definitely the island’s top dog. Boasting by far the largest concentration of people, industry and commerce, Colombo is a noisy, dirty, and vibrantly alive city; an ethnic melting pot both invigorating and exhausting.

Colombo 2011

Thanks to its natural harbor, Colombo has been an area of trade ever since ships first sailed the Indian Ocean, but didn’t become a city of any importance until the arrival of the Portuguese. But it’s made up for lost time. With a current metro population of over five million, Colombo is a vast urban sprawl which stretches for miles up and down the coast. The words “Sri Lanka” usually conjure serene images of tea plantations, rain forests and pristine nature, so landing in Colombo is a startling wake-up call to the busy modern life of the island.

We immediately fell into the rhythm of the city. Not difficult, since Colombo is fun. There’s the insane bazaar of the Pettah, the strangely militarized Fort District, the gorgeous temples around Beira Lake and Slave Island, tuk-tuks clamoring for business every two meters, historic hotels, excellent restaurants and a buoyant urban vibe which owes a lot to the city’s fantastic mixing of cultures.

On our first full day in Colombo, we visited a Hindu Temple, a Mosque, a Christian church, and a Buddhist temple. We got into conversations with practitioners of all these various faiths. Sinhalese, Tamil, Muslim… it didn’t matter: everyone was eager to talk with us, to find out where we’re from and what we’re doing. And they were especially interested to learn our impressions their country. A fail-proof way to elicit a huge Sri Lankan grin, is to gush about how wonderful Sri Lanka is. They’re very proud of their country… and their hectic capital city.

Book Your Travel Insurance Here

Monk Colombo
Mosque in Colombo
Cultures in Colombo
Mosque Sri Lanka
Reading The Koran
Musrlim Sri Lanka
Main Street Sri Lanka
Old City Hall Colombo
White Church of Sri Lanka
Teens in Sri Lanka
Multi Kulty Sri Lanka
Shiva Sri Lanka
Hindu Temple in Sri Lanka
Hindu
Buddhism in Sri Lanka
, , , , , ,
February 7, 2012 at 11:16 am Comment (1)
Galle Face Green Laid out in 1857 by the British governor Sir Henry Ward, Galle Face Green is a park separating the hectic life of Colombo and the Indian Ocean. The green is the city's largest open space and a popular spot during sunset, when hundreds of Sri Lankans come to fly kites, play cricket and eat ice cream.
For 91 Days